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Pocket Charts are definitely a classroom and home educational resource that could be use with every single subject in school. It’s such a great way to display information, charts, and games for children to them a visual of what you the parent/teacher are trying to convey to them. For this months Pocket Charts & Music I wanted to share how we have been using...

This month we have been having a blast with Finger Plays, while using our Pocket Chart and Music to help make our lesson interactive and exciting! Finger Play games and songs are wonderful to with young children to help them learn new poems, songs, and stories. I have always done finger plays with my girls and in the classroom, but now that Kaelyn is starting to...

This year we decided that we will be homeschooling throughout the year, so that it would give us a chance to really take our time and not rush through lessons.  One of the lessons that Kaelyn has definitely enjoyed the most and is excelling has been reading.  After learning many sight-words and word families, she has been reading up a storm.  One of...

Welcome to this month’s Pocket Charts & Music post at Enchanted Homeschooling Mom! This month we are going to be using our Pocket Charts to practice Sequencing of Events! Sequencing of events is an important lesson to teach during language arts, math, science, social studies, arts & crafts, and reading lessons. It assists with comprehension and allow...

Welcome to this months Making Learning Fun with Pocket Charts and Music! Kaelyn has been doing a wonderful job this month in math, but especially in addition. She especially loves working with manipulatives and games. Math is one of those subjects that I truly believe that children should be allowed to learn and explore with a hands on approach. The best part of manipulatives...

Last month in the Making Lessons Fun With Music and Pocket Charts series we began introducing high frequency words, which are also called sight words into our reading. There are about 100 high frequency words that we can use to build sentences. I’ve learned that the best thing that has worked for us and worked in my former classroom experience is to introduce...

Now that Kaelyn has learned all of her alphabet letters and is ready to begin reading, we have began reviewing beginning sounds. For her the best way to review lessons is to play games and what better way to do that than with our pocket charts playing a beginning sounds matching game. The cards that we use are part of our new curriculum that we have been using, but...

One of our daily routing is our Circle Time, in which we always incorporate counting in some way. For the past month we have been learning to count to 100, but just counting to 100 can be difficult for young learners, so that is why using a visual content such as a Pocket Chart and Music for repetition is always a great way to pull students into the lesson. We have...

Now that we have learned most of our alphabet letters, reviewing games are a great way to keep your child’s mind active on past letters learned. Remember that learning letter recognition is an important part of early literacy for your child. Children absorb information quickly, so the best way to do so is by games and music. I know that my child cannot sit...

A great way to review beginning sounds for early readers is to play Picture and Word Matching Games. Although, my daughter is not quite reading yet, she is beginning to sound out letters and realizes that she can figure out what the word says by looking at the beginning sounds of each word. So this month we are using our Pocket Chart for a Christmas Matching Game! To...

Last month we talked about what a pocket chart was and different ways in which we can use one in our homeschooling lessons. This month I want to share with you one of our favorite daily use for our pocket chart, singing our Days of the Week song. We use a lot of music during our lessons, but our Calendar & Weather time is definitely full of songs! I believe that...

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