The call of the American Robin







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Posted on Apr 9 2014 - 1:00am by Jill
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It’s finally warming up enough to see signs of spring, and one of the first signs for us is hearing the call of the robins!

I was lucky enough when I was 12 to have the opportunity to raise a family of robins, so I have a special fondness for this cheeky bird. Ours came back to visit us every spring for years and brought their babies, too! (It goes without saying that you should never try to get your hands on the babies….in my case, the mother was killed in a windstorm and was lying beside the nest, next where it had fallen.) I’ve put together what I think are some of the best resources around to help you observe my favourite wild bird.

The call of the American Robin - Enchanted Homeschooling Mom
This post contains affiliate links for some great books and guides.

Study resources:
If there are no robins in your area, take a look at this YouTube mini-documentary to see them in action and hear their cheerful song!

Or watch the time-lapse video of a robin’s nest over a month. The mother has 4 chicks to care for!

If you’d like to do a robins lapbook (http://dynamic2moms.webs.com/springunits.htm), Dynamic 2 Moms has a beautiful one available for free on their site. There’s another robin lapbook (http://www.homeschoolcreations.net/2009/05/robin-lapbook-and-unit-study/) for younger students free from Homeschool Creations also.

ExploringNature.org has a great robin information sheet (http://www.exploringnature.org/db/detail.php?dbID=43&detID=797) that an older student can use for creating a notebook page.

Here are some great tips for getting robins to come to your yard. (http://www.ornatebirdgarden.com/html/robins.html)

Cornell University offers a free bird coloring book (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/bbimages/pdfs/coloringbook.pdf) that includes American Robins and many other birds you can see in most backyards across North America.

Learn how to draw an American robin!(https://www.drawingnow.com/tutorials/19308/how-to-draw-a-robin/)

Arts and crafts:

The Graphics Fairy has a collection of free vintage robin images (http://thegraphicsfairy.com/?s=robin) if you’re looking to make notebook pages or for other artistic endeavors.

Try this robin footprint art with little learners! (http://sweetandsimplethings.blogspot.ca/2011/04/footprint-robin.html)

Older students might like to sew a felt robin (http://www.downeastthunderfarm.com/2012/02/felt-robin-ornament-pattern/) to hang indoors.

How about a paper plate robin craft (http://www.twinkl.co.uk/resource/t-t-4457-paper-plate-robin-craft-activity), complete with nest?

Books about robins that you might like to buy or borrow:

What have you learned about robins? Share your posts, links, or tips in the comments!

 

Usual Mayhem

Erin is a writer and the owner of The Usual Mayhem blog. She homeschools her two of her three children (the other’s already a graduate), runs a home daycare, and has more than 25 years of child-wrangling experience. You can find her on her blog (www.theusualmayhem.com), or on the other sites she writes for: MummyologyPre-K and K SharingB-Inspired Mama, and Serenity You. She also writes a weekly nature study class for SchoolhouseTeachers.com, an online learning site owned by The Old Schoolhouse magazine. She drinks far too much coffee and rarely sleeps.

 

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  • pisforpreschooler

    I love that the robins you raised visited you and even brought their off-spring. I think animals are so much more intelligent than we sometimes give them credit for! Thanks for these resources. Robins are one of the birds we see even in the city!

  • CraftyMomsShare

    What great resources!! We are just starting to look at birds for the spring and robins are definitely on our list. Thank you for sharing at Sharing Saturday!